mainlogo
Twitter Facebook LinkedIn
Car Insurance Quote
Phone(855) 587-2494

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in Utah

Advertising Disclosure

At PennyGeeks.com, our #1 goal is to provide users with reliable data and recommendations that help them find the best car insurance and products for their needs. However, to keep our site up and running, we do receive commission from some of the companies that appear on this page. This in no way influences the advice we provide, which is based on tireless research by our dedicated team.

We are also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in UtahUtah is home to some the country’s best national parks, serving up idyllic spots for sightseeing and birdwatching. But a day of enjoying the scenery can quickly turn into a morbid tour of the state’s courtrooms if you’re caught driving without car insurance.

Authorities take a hardline against motorists nabbed violating Utah’s mandatory insurance laws. Every driver is required to carry insurance meeting the state’s mandated minimum liability limits. These coverage amounts include:

  • $65,000 in Liability Coverage For Bodily Injury In One Collision
  • $25,000 in Liability Coverage For Bodily Injury To One Person
  • $25,000 in Liability Coverage For Damage to Property
  • $3,000 in Personal Injury Protection (PIP)

Purchasing coverage up to these amounts will ensure you have the means to cover the costs of treating injuries you or your passengers and other members listed on your policy sustain in an accident. However, many motorists choose to purchase additional components to cover other types of damage not included under a basic policy. It’s a smart move because the minimum liability limits will often fall short when reimbursing you for the full cost of damages you sustained, leaving you to shoulder the remaining costs.

In this article, we’ll explore:

  1. Penalties for driving with no insurance in Utah
  2. Reinstating your license and registration in Utah
  3. The “no-fault” insurance system in Utah
  4. Premium increases after a not-at-fault accident in Utah
  5. Reducing your insurance rates in Utah

If you are stopped by authorities, you will be required to present proof your vehicle is insured up to the state’s minimum coverage limits. Law enforcement officers will accept any official evidence of an existing policy, such as an insurance card issued by your provider or a printed copy of the declarations page of your coverage documents. If you are unable to present proof of insurance or officers discover that your vehicle is uninsured/underinsured, you could face the following penalties:

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in Utah

While the state’s vigilant troopers are always on the hunt for errant motorists, you may be nabbed for violating Utah’s insurance laws long before you have a chance to hit the road. The state makes use of an electronic database to keep tabs on local drivers. If your coverage lapses for any reason, you will receive a notification demanding proof of a current policy.

Whether you’re caught on the road or fail to comply with requests from the state, you could be ordered to pay steep fines. First-time offenders will have to fork over $400 in fines and an additional $50 in surcharges. Repeat offenders may have to pay as much as $1000 in fines. In most cases, your driving privileges (your license and vehicle’s registration) will be revoked or suspended.

How Can I Reinstate My License After Getting Caught Driving Without Car Insurance in Utah?

Before you can return to the road, the state will need to see proof that you are insured up to the mandated minimum liability limits. However, as someone who has violated Utah’s insurance laws, you will be required to purchase a type of coverage known as “SR-22 insurance” before your driving privileges are restored.

This type of policy covers you as an individual rather than just your vehicle. As a result, it’s often far more expensive than a standard basic policy. Your insurer will also need to file an SR-22 form/certificate on your behalf to update the state on the status of your coverage. If you let your insurance lapse – you may have missed a payment or cancelled your plan – your provider must report this change to authorities. Not only will your license and registration be re-suspended, you will also have to restart the SR-22 filing period (typically around 3 years) from scratch.

Keep in mind that any driver requiring SR-22 insurance is regarded as a high-risk motorist. Statistically, this category of driver is more likely to be involved in an accident than the average road user.

FAQs About Driving Without Car Insurance in Utah

Is Utah a No-Fault State?

Yes. Unlike most other states, Utah employs a no-fault system when handling auto insurance claims. Simply put, components of your policy will kick in to reimburse you for medical costs stemming from an accident regardless of whether you caused the accident or not. In so-called “fault” states, the driver responsible for causing the crash can be held liable for any damages sustained by the other party/parties involved.

While a “no-fault” system will ensure your medical costs are covered in the event of an accident, you have little recourse if your policy features fall short as you are not legally allowed to file a lawsuit or third-party insurance claim against the party/parties involved unless your injuries meet certain criteria. Injuries and conditions that fall under these thresholds include:

  • Permanent disability
  • Permanent disfigurement
  • Permanent impairment
  • Dismemberment

Can My Premiums Increase After a Not-At-Fault Accident in Utah?

Unfortunately, yes. Statistically, if you have been involved in an accident – regardless of who caused it – you are now far more likely to be involved in another collision. Insurers calculate a significant portion of your premium based on your personal risk profile. Some factors your provider will also consider include:

  • Your permanent driving record;
  • Your accident history;
  • Your driving experience;
  • Average annual mileage;
  • Your age;
  • Your occupation;
  • Your car make, model, and age; and
  • Your credit history.

How Can I Reduce My Premium in Utah?

If you were caught driving without insurance, chances are you are now paying a small fortune to retain your driving privileges. While this financial burden will be lifted once you have fulfilled your SR-22 filing requirements, you can take several steps to reduce your premium right now.

Firstly, our Geeks recommend tinkering with your deductible. This amount represents how much you would have to pay to cover costs before your policy features kick in to reimburse you for the remainder. A high deductible offers less protection but will help reduce your premium. Alternatively, a low deductible will safeguard you against unexpected expenses but will increase your policy rates.

Secondly, you should scrap any policy features that you feel you are unlikely to use. However, make sure that your policy still complies with the state’s insurance laws. And finally, you should take advantage of any discounts offered by your insurer.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in Ohio

Advertising Disclosure

At PennyGeeks.com, our #1 goal is to provide users with reliable data and recommendations that help them find the best car insurance and products for their needs. However, to keep our site up and running, we do receive commission from some of the companies that appear on this page. This in no way influences the advice we provide, which is based on tireless research by our dedicated team.

We are also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in OhioHome of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Ohio is a top destination for the genre’s headbanging enthusiasts. But if you’re nabbed driving without car insurance, you’d better get ready to face the music because local authorities take a no-holds-barred approach toward errant motorists breaking the state’s mandatory insurance laws.

Much like other parts of the U.S., Ohio’s Department of Transport requires all drivers to purchase and maintain a car insurance policy meeting state-specific minimum coverage limits. In Ohio, you must purchase at least:

  • $25,000 in bodily injury coverage for one person
  • $50,000 in bodily injury coverage per accident
  • $25,000 in damage to property coverage

This basic policy will ensure that you have the financial means to cover damages sustained by the other parties involved in an accident you caused. These features will not protect you against financial loss and more often than not, these limits will fall short reimbursing others in more severe crashes.

Many motorists choose to invest in additional features – such as collision insurance, comprehensive coverage, and uninsured motorist protection – to safeguard themselves against extreme financial loss in an accident.

In this blog, we will explore and explain:

  1. The penalties for driving without auto insurance
  2. SR-22 filing requirements
  3. Fault states
  4. Uninsured motorist coverage

When you are pulled over on Ohio’s public roads, law enforcement officers will demand to see proof your vehicle is insured up to the state’s mandated minimum liability limits. If you cannot produce evidence of a current policy or your car is not insured, you could face the penalties outlined below.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in Ohio

Driving without coverage in the state is not only illegal but can also result in long-term increases in your future policy’s rates. If you are caught violating the state’s insurance laws, your license and vehicle’s registration may be suspended for up to 2 years; you may have to fulfill SR-22 filing requirements for a period of 3 years; you could be fined (the amount is dictated by the courts); and you will have to fork over between $160 to $660 to reinstate your driving privileges.

FAQs About Driving Without Auto Insurance in Ohio

What Are the SR-22 Filing Requirements in Ohio?

If your license is suspended in Ohio, you will first have to fulfil the state’s SR-22 filing requirements before your driving privileges are restored. But what is an SR-22?

This document is a type of form/certificate filed by your insurer on your behalf. It shows that you – as an individual rather than just your vehicle – are insured up to the state’s mandated minimum liability limits. To meet the requirements for this certificate, you will have to purchase what is known as “SR-22 insurance”. Unlike standard policies which cover just a single vehicle, this type of insurance will protect you regardless of what vehicle you are driving. Unsurprisingly, due to its all-inclusive nature, this policy will cost you more than most other forms of coverage.

You will have to maintain unbroken SR-22 coverage for up to 3 years. If you let your insurance lapse for any reason – such as cancellation of your policy or due to missed payments – your provider is required to inform Ohio’s Bureau of Motor Vehicles that you are no longer insured. The kicker: You will have to restart the SR-22 filing process from square one.

Is Ohio a Fault State?

Yes. In Ohio, the at-fault driver – the motorist responsible for causing the accident – can be held liable for any damages sustained by the other parties involve. A claims adjuster belonging to the insurance company will investigate the accident to help determine who was at-fault. Typically, the proportion of blame is shared and assigned to each driver in the form of a percentage point.

While in some cases, it may be clear that one driver was wholly responsible for the crash, in most cases, fault will be shared among all the motorists involved. For example, a reckless driver rear-ended your vehicle on the highway while making a dangerous lane change. However, evidence shows that you were talking on your cellphone and could’ve taken steps to avoid the accident if you were concentrating on the road. The claims adjuster may decide you were 25% responsible for the crash taking place and could be held liable for this percentage of the overall damages.

Is Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage Available in Ohio?

It’s estimated that nearly 14% of the country’s drivers hit the road without adequate coverage. As a result, your risk of crashing into another motorist who does not have the financial means to compensate you for your loss is far higher than you may have expected.

Fortunately, insurers now offer uninsured motorist coverage to help safeguard your finances after an accident. If you’re involved in a collision with an at-fault driver who is uninsured, this addon will kick in to reimburse you for damages you sustained. There are three main types of uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage in Ohio:

  1. Uninsured Motorist Property Damage Coverage: This feature will reimburse you for any property damage to your vehicle caused by an uninsured motorist. However, if you have or plan to purchase collision coverage, we recommend increasing your existing limits instead as this core addon already covers any damage sustained in accidents involving other vehicles, objects, and even potholes.
  1. Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury Coverage: Even minor injuries can cost thousands of dollars to treat. This policy feature will kick in reimburse you for any medical costs for treating injuries you, or anyone else in your vehicle, sustained in a collision caused by an uninsured motorist.
  1. Underinsured Motorist Coverage: You don’t only need to worry about the uninsured, the underinsured – those who purchase coverage that will inevitably fall short– pose just as much of a threat to your bank account as those hitting the road with no coverage at all. This policy will reimburse you for damages when the at-fault driver’s insurance policy runs dry, ensuring you have the funds necessary to get back on the road.

 

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in New Jersey

Advertising Disclosure

At PennyGeeks.com, our #1 goal is to provide users with reliable data and recommendations that help them find the best car insurance and products for their needs. However, to keep our site up and running, we do receive commission from some of the companies that appear on this page. This in no way influences the advice we provide, which is based on tireless research by our dedicated team.

We are also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in New JerseyBetween the complicated highways, non-sensical turnpikes, and pothole-cratered residential streets, New Jersey is a challenging place to drive for veteran motorists and newcomers alike. Despite these hazards, some drivers still take on the added gamble of driving without insurance, risking extreme financial loss in the event of accident (not to mention steep fines for getting caught).

In New Jersey, all motorists are required to carry insurance meeting the state’s mandated minimum liability limits. Simply put: A driver must purchase coverage including certain features up to specific amounts stipulated by the state.

Unlike most other states, New Jersey is a so-called “no-fault” state. As a result, injuries you sustain in an accident will be covered by your own insurance policy regardless of whether you caused the accident or not. Drivers must carry auto insurance that includes the following minimum limits:

  • Property damage liability ($5,000 per accident)
  • Personal Injury Protection ($15,000 per person, per accident)

While a basic policy is necessary to fulfill the state’s mandatory minimum insurance laws, it will almost always fall short when covering the full costs of treating injuries and repairing your vehicle after a serious crash. Many drivers choose to purchase additional components for added protection to ensure that a wide variety of damages are covered. For example, a driver looking to protect his/her property against damage caused by a natural disaster would elect to invest in comprehensive coverage. Keep in mind, these additions will increase your premiums.

In this article, we’ll explore:

  1. Penalties for driving without car insurance in New Jersey
  2. How to reinstate your license after being caught driving without auto insurance
  3. What if I’m involved in an accident with a person driving without car insurance?
  4. Will I be considered a high-risk driver if I’m caught without car insurance?

If you are pulled over by a law enforcement officer or are involved in accident, authorities will request to see proof that your vehicle is insured up to the state’s minimum liability limits. In NJ, officers will accept either electronic or printed evidence such as an insurance card issued by your provider. If you cannot present this proof and officers discover that your vehicle’s insurance has lapsed or your car is uninsured, you could face the penalties we’ve listed below.

Penalties for Driving Without Car Insurance in New Jersey

New Jersey lawmakers have little patience for drivers caught without auto insurance. The state enforces some of the strictest penalties in the country for errant motorists caught violating its mandatory insurance laws.

Based on the nature of your violation – for example, if you were driving while intoxicated or were involved in an accident ­– you could face steep fines, additional surcharge assessment fees, a community service sentence, suspension of your license, vehicle impoundment, and even jail time. Keep in mind, if this is your second, third, or subsequent offense, you may be strapped with added penalties.

As a first-time offender, you could be fined $300 to $1,000 and may be ordered to pay a $250 surcharge for three years (that’s a total payment of $750.). Additionally, your license could be suspended for a year and you may be forced to comply with a prolonged community service sentence. If your vehicle is impounded by authorities, you will have to pay $100 to reclaim it.

As a serial offender, your fine could scale as high as $5,000. Fortunately, the surcharge total remains the same, but your license may be suspended for an extra year. Additionally, you may be ordered to complete 180 hours of community service and could spend up to two weeks behind bars.

How to Reinstate Your License After Being Caught Driving Without Auto Insurance

Unlike many other states, New Jersey does not offer motorists opportunities to fast track their license suspensions. Not only will you have to wait out your suspension period, but you will also have to fulfill all obligations set out by the courts and the Department of Motor Vehicles before your driving privileges are restored. These requirements can include completing your community service sentence and paying off your outstanding fines.

You will need to show the Department proof of an insurance policy meeting the state’s mandated minimum liability limits.

What If I’m Involved in an Accident with a Person Driving Without Insurance?

Uninsured drivers are a highway hazard for anyone driving in the country. In New Jersey, it’s estimated that more than 14% of all motorists are not carrying adequate coverage. But what does this mean for you?

If you’re involved in an accident with one of these errant motorists, it’s unlikely they will have the financial means to compensate you for your loss. You do have the option to file a lawsuit against the driver, but in most cases this is a dead-end, amounting to little more than a protracted legal battle with a tiny payoff worth half as much as the cost of reaching the verdict. Your best bet: Invest in uninsured motorist coverage.

While New Jersey does not require motorists to carry this added feature, our Geeks recommend purchasing this relatively inexpensive addon to bolster your existing coverage. This policy addon will reimburse you for property damage and/or medical costs related to an accident involving an uninsured, at-fault driver.

Will I Be Considered a High-Risk Driver If I’m Caught Without Car Insurance?

Probably. Insurance companies use the term “high-risk driver” to describe motorists who have a higher than average chance of causing or being involved in an accident. As a result, high-risk drivers pay more for insurance than the average motorist.

If you were caught violating insurance laws, nabbed driving while intoxicated, caused a serious accident, or violating many of the state’s traffic laws, it’s possible you are now considered a high-risk driver. Any traffic violations you commit and accidents you are involved in (or caused) are recorded on your permanent driving record. Insurers use this document to help calculate your premiums.

However, you can still reduce your premiums as a high-risk driver by taking time to pick up safer driving habits, completing a driving safety course, avoiding accidents for a few years, and not committing traffic violations in that same time period. Additional discounts are available to motorists who drive less and invest in cars equipped with advanced safety features. Contact your provider to learn more about their premium discounts.

How Auto Insurance Companies Determine Fault in Car Accidents

Advertising Disclosure

At PennyGeeks.com, our #1 goal is to provide users with reliable data and recommendations that help them find the best car insurance and products for their needs. However, to keep our site up and running, we do receive commission from some of the companies that appear on this page. This in no way influences the advice we provide, which is based on tireless research by our dedicated team.

We are also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

How Auto Insurance Companies Determine Fault in Car AccidentsWho caused the accident? This fundamental question lies at the heart of any insurance claim, helping providers calculate and determine fair compensation to the motorists involved. But this simple question doesn’t always have an easy answer. Often, claims adjusters have to perform detailed investigations to determine insurance liability.

Before we delve into the process of determining fault, we will first look at the difference between “fault” states and “no-fault” states. In so-called “no-fault” states, drivers are required by law to carry Personal Injury Protection (PIP) or Med Pay. This coverage will kick in to pay for medical costs stemming from an accident regardless of who or what was to blame for the accident. Typically, you won’t be able to file a lawsuit in these states unless your claim meets certain state-specific criteria (i.e. you suffered a permanent disability or incurred significant damages).

The following states have no-fault auto insurance laws: Florida, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Utah. But the majority of states follow a “fault system.” In these states, motorists have three main avenues to pursue when seeking compensation for damages sustained in a crash:

  1. Filing a claim against the at-fault motorist’s auto insurance provider;
  2. Filing a claim with their own insurer; or
  3. Filing a lawsuit against the at-fault motorist.

To recover compensation in a third-party claim, you will be required to prove that the other motorist was at fault. Important evidence might include a copy of the official police accident report, photographs taken at the site of the crash, witness statements, and more.

It is now up to the insurance company’s claims adjuster – an individual responsible for resolving claims – to conduct a complete investigation to determine fault. Fault is not a black-and-white equation; it is not uncommon for multiple parties to share liability.

For example, let’s assume a distracted driver rear-ended your vehicle on the highway. However, the official accident report reveals that you had changed lanes in front of the driver without signaling. Your insurer may decide that you were 25% responsible for causing the accident. Depending on your state, you could now be held liable for 25% of the damages sustained by the other party/parties involved. This illustrates the importance of building a watertight case as a few percentage points can add up to tens of thousands of dollars depending on the circumstances.

Take note: In states that employ modified comparative negligence laws, such as Iowa, your claim will most likely be rejected if a claims adjuster concludes that you were more than 50% to blame for an accident taking place.

How to Help the Insurance Company Determine Fault After a Car Accident

If you are involved in a collision, there are steps you can take to streamline the claims process and help the insurance adjuster determine fault. Keep the following tips in mind:

1. Get a Police Report

In the event of a severe accident – typically where one or more parties sustained injuries, or property damaged exceeded $1,000 – police may be phoned in to compile an investigative report on the crash. This report is a document detailing important information surrounding the accident, such as whether any of the drivers involved were ticketed for a moving violation, any of the drivers tested over the legal blood alcohol limit, or any of the drivers were driving without insurance.

In negotiations with insurers, the success of your claim can hinge on the information inside this report. However, this report can contain inaccurate information, in which case you can request to amend the details, or you can bring in other evidence such as eyewitness testimony to corroborate your version of events.

2. Don’t Admit Fault at the Scene

Regardless of the circumstances, you should never confess to causing an accident. Insurance adjusters are looking for any evidence to dispute your claim – and a crash-site confession is going to put you in their crosshairs.

In the moment it may seems like the crash was your fault, but additional evidence could later emerge showing you were not entirely to blame for the accident taking place. If you are involved in a collision, focus on taking down the contact details and insurance information of the other party/parties involved instead.

3. Gather Evidence at the Scene

It can be hard to keep calm after a crash but gathering the right evidence in the minutes following a collision can mean all the difference. Using your phone or a camera, take photographs of any property damage you sustained in the crash. You should also snap pictures of road markings, street signs, and anything else that may help you prove fault.

Gathering witness statements can also help bolster your case by lending even more credibility to your version of events. Don’t forget to take down the contact details of any witnesses you speak to as the claims adjuster may need this information to follow up.

In addition to an invoice of your repair bill, you should also include both a receipt of your current and future medical costs for injuries you sustained in the crash. Many drivers forget to include a full list of these expenses as part of their claim and are burned later when compensation falls short.

4. Find out If the Other Driver Has Auto Insurance

While most states have laws requiring all drivers to carry insurance meeting minimum liability limits, many drivers still risk fines and other penalties by driving without adequate coverage. If you’re involved in an accident with an at-fault, uninsured driver, it’s likely that this motorist does not have the means to reimburse you for property damage and injuries you sustained. While you could file a lawsuit against the at-fault party, many attorneys advise against this as a protracted legal battle will cost you more than you stand to save.

You best bet: Purchase uninsured motorist insurance. This added layer of protection is relatively affordable and will kick in to cover costs resulting from an accident involving an underinsured/uninsured driver.

Does Car Insurance Cover Pain and Suffering?

Advertising Disclosure

At PennyGeeks.com, our #1 goal is to provide users with reliable data and recommendations that help them find the best car insurance and products for their needs. However, to keep our site up and running, we do receive commission from some of the companies that appear on this page. This in no way influences the advice we provide, which is based on tireless research by our dedicated team.

We are also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Does Car Insurance Cover Pain and Suffering?Even minor accidents can cause major injuries, costing you a small fortune in medical treatment. But if the at-fault driver had car insurance or you carried no-fault insurance, this policy should offset the cost of healthcare. It may also provide compensation for pain and suffering.

Pain and suffering is a legal term used to describe any type of pain — mental, emotional, or physical — sustained or stemming from a crash. At its most basic level, this definition can include the cost of treating injuries, such as broken bones or wounds. But this term can also extend to mental conditions such as post traumatic stress disorder or general pain and discomfort inhibiting your ability to do your job or affecting your quality of life.

Does No-Fault Car Insurance Cover Pain and Suffering?

Yes. In so-called “fault” states, pain and suffering is usually covered as part of bodily injury liability insurance. The catch: Unless you’ve purchased additional coverage, such as Personal Injury Protection (PIP), this feature will only reimburse other parties for damages stemming from an accident you caused. In order to seek compensation for your own pain and suffering, you would need to carry no-fault insurance or file a claim against the at-fault driver.

In “no-fault” states, the mandatory PIP or Medpay component of your insurance policy should chip in to help you pay your medical bills regardless of fault.

More FAQs About Car Insurance and Pain and Suffering

What Is Personal Injury Protection (PIP)?

In states where PIP is offered, it is usually an optional addition to liability coverage. Also called “no-fault coverage,” PIP will always kick in to help cover your medical bills regardless of whether you caused the accident or not.

PIP coverage with a low deductible can sometimes double your premiums. But these added costs net you comprehensive injury coverage, ensuring you have the funds to pay for the costs of medical treatment, lost wages, and even transportation expenses.

PIP is available as an optional extra in Wyoming, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Washington, Vermont, Virginia, Texas, Tennessee, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Ohio, North Carolina, Nevada, New Mexico, Maine, Louisiana, Iowa, Indiana, Illinois, Idaho, Georgia, Connecticut, Colorado, California, Arizona, Arkansas, Alabama, and Alaska.

PIP coverage is a compulsory inclusion in the following states: Washington D.C., Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Michigan, New York, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Utah.

What Is Medpay?

Medpay is another type of no-fault insurance. It covers medical expenses incurred by the driver and his or her passengers; however, it won’t reimburse you for lost wages, transports costs, or trauma counselling.

Will My Health Insurance Cover Injuries Sustained in a Car Accident?

Yes, most health insurance plans will cover the medical costs associated with treating injuries sustained in a crash. However, there are two important factors to consider: First, the features of your auto insurance policy or the at-fault driver’s policy will pay first, and second, you will still have to pay your health plan’s deductible before your coverage kicks in to reimburse you for the remaining costs. Simply put, health insurance is your last line of defense when other insurance coverage has been exhausted.

What Is a Deductible?

A deductible is the amount you will have to pay to cover the cost of damages before the relevant policy features reimburse you for the remainder of the expenses. A low deductible will arm you with better protection against financial loss but will increase your monthly or yearly premiums. A high deductible will put you at risk of losing more money in the event of the worst, but you will pay significantly less to maintain your policy.

What Is Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury (UMBI) Protection?

Most states require drivers to carry insurance that meets certain minimum liability limits. This ensures that at-fault motorists have the means to compensate the other parties involved in a crash. However, many drivers choose to risk the fines and jail time by driving without insurance. If you’re involved in an accident with an at-fault, uninsured driver, he or she may be unable to cover the costs of treating injuries you sustained in the collision.

Uninsured motorist bodily injury (UMBI) protection is a relatively inexpensive addon to your basic policy that will reimburse you for pain and suffering resulting from an accident involving an underinsured/uninsured driver. It will also cover the costs of treating injuries sustained by anyone else listed on your policy, such as relatives, friends, and employees.

States with a high rate of uninsured drivers include Florida, New Mexico, Michigan, Mississippi, Arkansas, Indiana, Washington, Alabama, Tennessee, and Washington DC.

Is It Worth Investing in Emergency Road Service Coverage for an Accident?

In the event of a severe collision, your vehicle may be beyond repair. Instead of relying on an unknown towing company that will charge you hundreds of dollars just to move your vehicle from the street, you can prepare for any eventuality (and save money) by including Emergency Road Service insurance as part of your policy. This affordable feature won’t just cover the costs of towing your wrecked vehicle to the shop; it also provides compensation for:

  • Tire changes;
  • Battery services;
  • Locksmith services for when you lock your keys in the car;
  • Tire changes; and
  • On-site mechanical labor.

Many providers will sweeten the deal by including Emergency Road Service insurance as part of their offerings. However, if you do not have this type of coverage, our Geeks recommend purchasing Emergency Road Service insurance. For a few more dollars every month, you’re buying peace of mind that your next breakdown (or accident) won’t break the bank.

Now that you understand the ins and outs of which insurance policies and features do and do not cover pain and suffering, it’s time to compare your options and find the right policy for your budget and needs. Click here to use our auto insurance quote comparison tool.